Durham Children's Watershed Festival

NOTICE: Due to COVID-19, the 2020 Festival delivery has

been modified to a FREE in-school program for grade 4 students. 

DETAILS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AS PER SCHOOL BOARD RESTRICTIONS. 

2020 We Come To You! 

WHO

Central Lake Ontario Conservation's Education Team

Grade 4 Students

Grade 4 Teachers

2-4 Adult Volunteers from your school 

WHAT

2 hour in-school program consisting of 4 water-related interactive activities

See "Activity Options" below

(max 2 classes per program)

WHERE

Your school's gym 

This program can be delivered in your school's library or your classroom if the gym is

unavailable, though activities and hands-on opportunities will be limited

WHEN

September - December

ACTIVITY OPTIONS

Decide on your favourite activities from below so you can indicate your top 6 preferences on the registration form.  4 of these 6 activities will be chosen for your program based on the space provided (e.g. gym, library, or classroom), number of students participating, and the number of adult volunteers from your school.

 

Each activity is designed to address water conservation, water protection and the preservation of the natural environment in a fun, hands-on and interactive way.  Students will learn how many of their everyday needs and choices impact interrelationships within the natural environment and their watershed community.


The curriculum expectations addressed in these activities relates to human impact on habitats and how we can better balance the needs of humans and the environment to support a healthy livable community for plants, people and animals.

BALANCING H2O

Using scales and water jugs, students visualize that their bodies are 70% water and gain an understanding that their health and survival is dependent on water.

LOCATION: 

gym, classroom, or library

3 STRIKES YOU'RE OUT

In an amphibian life cycle game, students role play as frogs confronted with the challenges faced in a wetland habitat.

LOCATION: gym

CLIMATE CHANGE - WEIGHING THE FACTS

Using a balancing scale, students learn the effects of daily activities on the earth’s climate and gain an understanding of the  interconnectedness within the natural environment.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

CAN WE DRINK THAT?

Students participate in an interactive Yes/No game that explores water concepts and tests their knowledge on daily safe water practices.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

WE USE THAT MUCH?

Through a matching activity, students may be surprised to learn how much water is used to make common everyday products including jeans and cell phones.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

OSPREY SURVIVOR

Students role play as osprey parents searching for suitable food for their offspring and learn about water pollution’s impact on ospreys, survival and food chains.

LOCATION: gym 

ENVIROSCAPE

A hands-on watershed model of a typical community helps students understand how water pollution occurs and how we can all help to prevent it.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

GREAT GREEN CHOICES

Through a sorting activity, students learn the environmental impact of their lunch choices.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library (needs some floor space)

ROLLING THRU THE SHED
 

Students learn about water pollution by pretending to be water droplets rolling thru a watershed.

LOCATION: gym 

***Requires 5 gym mats***

MIGRATION STATION

Through a role-playing game, students investigate the challenges that water bird species face during a migration cycle including habitat loss and pollution.

LOCATION: gym 

NO WATER OFF A DUCK'S BACK

Acting as a wildlife biologist, students observe and clean feathers to understand the effects of oil spills on wildlife and their habitats. Students are encouraged to think about the impacts of everyday actions such as pouring used oil  down road drains.

LOCATION: gym or classroom

THE SCOOP ON POOP - PROTECT THE WATERSHED

Each day in the Durham Region approximately 17,000 kg of dog poop per day is not picked up by pet owners. When it rains, this leads to contamination of our watershed.  Students learn the difference between poop and scat and practice stooping and scooping our dog poop models.

LOCATION: gym 

LOW SALT DIET
 

Salt is most often used to get rid of ice because it melts ice and is inexpensive. When salt melts ice, it dissolves into the water and is carried into streams and lakes (surface water) or is absorbed into the ground (groundwater).  Students explore other de-icer options and, after spinning the weather wheel, determine the best de-icer for the conditions. 

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

DOWN THE DRAIN

Through a sorting activity, students learn to categorize a variety of hazardous & non-hazardous waste materials.  They learn the meaning of warning symbols that are common on household items and gain an understanding of the environmental impacts of disposing of hazardous waste down storm drains.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library (needs some floor space)

WELL SEALED

Two well models help students understand how easily it is to pass contamination from one well to another and that it is important to make sure that wells are protected from pollutants so our groundwater stays clean.

LOCATION: gym, classroom, or library

CONTACT INFO

Yvonne Storm

Central Lake Ontario Conservation

Special Events Coordinator

905 579 0411 ext 144

ystorm@cloca.com

Thank you to our 2020 Sponsors...

Healthy watersheds for today and tomorrow.
Canada Helps Logo

Working in Partnership

Central Lake Ontario Conservation is a

non-profit agency and registered charity: BN: 106887102RR0001

© 2019 by Central Lake Ontario Conservation

100 Whiting Avenue, Oshawa, ON L1H 3T3

Email: mail@cloca.com, Phone: 905-579-0411